9366. Georgian Silver Wine Funnel - Sold

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An elegant antique sterling silver wine strainer, or port strainer, with plain styling and simple thumbpiece. Excellent classic style. This wine funnel is made in three detachable parts – the strainer, funnel and a rare feature is the additional detachable ring which was used for holding the muslin securely. Handsome plain design with reed and gadroon borders. To the front there is a hand engraved monogram in old fashioned cursive script. Weight 95 grams, 3 troy ounces. Height 13 cms. Diameter 8.7 cms. London 1815. Maker William Bateman I.

Biography - Hester Bateman (1708–1794) is probably the most well known of all English lady silversmiths and her work is highly collectible. She married the goldsmith John Bateman in 1732 and together they worked a small silversmith business. Following the death of her husband in 1760 she successfully ran her family business for thirty years and was succeeded in turn by her sons, grandson and great-grandson and the Bateman family silversmithing company lasted until the middle of the nineteenth century. Hester had at least five children - Jonathan, Peter, probably John (who may have been connected with the business, although he is only recorded as a watch and clock-maker), Letitia (who married Richard Clarke), and Ann. Only Peter, Letitia, and Ann were still living at the time of Hester's death. Hester registered her mark at Goldsmith's Hall ‘April 16, 1761, as Hester Bateman in Bunnhill Row and this mark was used until 1790. Hester died in 1794.

 

Her sons PETER BATEMAN and JOHN BATEMAN registered their mark in 1790. This partnership was of short duration as Jonathan, who married Ann Downlinff, died in 1791.

 

In 1791 the mark was changed to PETER and ANN BATEMAN, Jonathan's widow.  

 

In 1800 was registered the mark of PETER BATEMAN, ANN BATEMAN and WILLIAM (I) BATEMAN. William Bateman was the son of Jonathan and Ann Bateman who in 1800 entered in partnership with his uncle Peter and his mother Ann.

 

In 1805, after the retirement of Ann, was registered the new mark of PETER BATEMAN and WILLIAM (I) BATEMAN.

 

From 1815 to 1840 WILLIAM (I) BATEMAN was registered alone.

 

From 1839 to 1843 was registered the mark of WILLIAM (II) BATEMAN (son of William I) & DANIELL BALL. 

Condition - This practical silver wine funnel is in very good condition with no damage or restoration. Stamped with a full set of English silver hallmarks on the strainer, the funnel has the lion and makers mark, the muslin holder is unmarked. Please note that this item is not new and will show moderate signs of wear commensurate with age. Reflections in the photograph may detract from the true representation of this item.

Literature - Literature - The wine funnel became common towards the end of the 18th century; a few rare earlier examples exist. With the modern wine making methods wine funnels are generally used just for decanting wine however in olden times the wine needed to be filtered before drinking it. The pierced platform is not normally sufficient to strain the wine properly and needs a piece of muslin fitted between the pierced section and the spout. There are two main varieties: the first has a spout which detaches just below the bowl of the funnel, the other has a detachable inner bowl with a pierced centre inside the main bowl. Occasionally there is a further detachable ring which held the muslin firmly. Funnels exist without a pierced strainer and were probably used to decant liquor or possibly perfume; these are normally smaller in size.

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