9412. George III Silver Shell Dishes - Price £1,275

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A delightful pair of antique sterling silver butter dishes in the form of a scallop shell. Lovely simple design. Pretty little whelk shell feet. Excellent condition and good gauge silver. Weight 232 grams, 7.45 troy ounces. Each measures 15x13.5cm. Height 2.8cm. London 1802. Maker Robert, David & Samuel Hennell.

Biography - Hennell Family (worked from 1728).  

David Hennell I was apprenticed to Edward Wood 6 September 1728. Married 1 March 1736 to Hannah Broomhead.. First mark entered as largeworker, 23 June 1736. Address: King's Head Court, Gutter Lane. The Hennell's had fifteen children of which only five reached maturity. David retired from business in 1773 and died 1785.  

Robert Hennell I, fifth child of David Hennell I, apprenticed to his father in 1756, free 1763. 1st mark in partnership with David I 1763. 2nd similar. 3rd mark alone as smallworker 1772. 4th mark as saltmaker 1773. 5th mark in partnership with son David II as 3rd partner 1802   

Robert Hennell II, son of John Hennell, elder brother of Robert Hennell I. Apprenticed to his uncle Robert Hennell I 1778, free 1785. Also apprenticed to John Houle as engraver. 1st mark entered as plateworker with Henry Nutting 1808. 2nd,3rd and 4th marks mark alone 1809,1820 and 1826. Retired 1833.   

Samuel Hennell, son of Robert Hennell I. 1st mark entered as third partner to his father and brother in 1802. 2nd mark with Robert Hennell only 1802. 3rd mark alone 1811. 4th mark in partnership with John Terry 1814, terminated 1816.   

David Hennell II, apprenticed to his father Robert Hennell I 1782, free 1789. Livery 1791. 1st mark in partnership with his father 1795.  Second mark, with brother Samuel added to the partnership 1802. Resigned from Livery 1821. 

Condition - These antique silver shells are in very good condition with no damage or restoration. Stamped underneath with a full set of matching English silver hallmarks.
Please note that this item is not new and will show moderate signs of wear commensurate with age. Reflections in the photograph may detract from the true representation of this item.

Literature - Antique Silver Dishes were originally made for very specific purposes such as the shell “butter” dishes and scalloped “strawberry dishes” which first appeared in the early 1700’s. During the later 18th and 19th centuries an extensive range of small open silver dishes evolved which make a practical addition to any dining table.

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