9027. Antique Silver Chambersticks - Price £1,650

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A rare pair of antique sterling silver chambersticks, or “go to bed”, with a rise and fall prick candlestick mechanism. Good plain design with fixed sconce and a broad curved and scroll handle. The pan has a decorative hand engraved monogram. The sconces and one snuffer have a matching lion crest. London 1813. Maker Emes & Barnard.

Biography - This old established manufacturing silversmith business was originally established by Anthony Nelme c.1680 passing to Francis Nelme on his death in 1722. Thomas Whipham took over the business in 1739, passing it to his son Thomas Whipham jr in 1756 who took into partnership Charles Wright.

The business was amalgamated by Henry Chawner in 1786; Chawner, who had been Edward Barnard I’s and Barnard’s son Edward's master, became foreman of the firm. Chawner retired in 1796 and John Emes became a partner, maintaining Edward Barnard II as manager. Emes died in 1808 and his widow Rebecca took as partner Edward Barnard II. Rebecca Emes withdrew in 1829 and Edward Barnard I became the proprietor with his son Edward Barnard II, John Barnard and William Barnard, trading as Edward Barnard & Sons.

After the retirement of Edward Barnard I the firm was continued by Edward Barnard II (1846-1851), John Barnard I (1846-1868), William Barnard (1846), Edward Barnard III (1868), Walter Barnard (1868-1903), John Barnard II (1868-1903), Michael Barnard (1896-1903), Stanley Barnard (1896-1903) and Robert Dubcock (1896). The firm became a limited liability company in 1910 trading as Edward Barnard & Sons Ltd. In 1977 Edward Barnard & Sons Limited became a subsidiary of Padgett & Braham Ltd.

Condition - These attractive chambersticks are in very good condition with no damage or restoration. Both pans and one snuffer are fully marked with clear and matching English silver hallmarks. The nozzles and one snuffer have matching crests, the second nozzle has an engraved armorial. The snuffer handles have a different decoration.

Please note that this item is not new and will show moderate signs of wear commensurate with age. Reflections in the photograph may detract from the true representation of this item.

Literature - Chambersticks first made an appearance in the 17th century and early examples are now very hard to find. Originally they were made in sets as a household would need many chambersticks. They were used for lighting the way to bed and because of the movement created when they were carried about they needed a large drip pan to catch the wax. The earliest examples have straight handles (first flat, then tubular) which were superceded in the first part of the 18th century by a ring handle. Gradually the design evolved and from the mid 18th century onwards they usually had a matching conical snuffer although from about 1790 onwards some were made with an aperture at the base of the stem to take a pair of scissor snuffers.

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