9020. Antique Queen Anne Silver Lemon Strainer - Price £1,650

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A rare early English antique silver strainer of circular form with a turned over rim. *Britannia standard silver. The bowl has drilled pierced holes with a five-pointed star to the centre. The acanthus shaped handles have hand decoration. Weight 68 grams, 2.1 troy oz. Spread 18.5 cm, 7.5 inches. Marked to the reverse of handles with the Britannia standard mark for John Chartier and second makers mark, F R or IB in a shaped cartouche with two pellets above. London circa 1710-15.

Biography -  John Chartier was the son of a Huguenot refugee from Blois. This important silversmith was naturalised in 1697, made a freeman of the Goldsmiths Company in 1698, and entered 2 marks as a largeworker between 1698 and 1699. His son Daniel was apprenticed to him in 1720 and his daughter married Peze Pilleau.

Condition - This fine antique strainer is in very good condition with no damage or restoration. Both handles have the maker’s mark for John Chartiers and also a second maker FR or IB, marks badly struck. The bowl is unmarked. Bowl shape slightly not round from use over the years.

Please note that this item is not new and will show moderate signs of wear commensurate with age. Reflections in the photograph may detract from the true representation of this item.

Literature - Orange or lemon strainers were peculiar to the 18th century and were probably used in conjunction with punch bowls to filter out the fruit pips. They were made with one or two handles. The one handled strainer sometimes had a small tongue or lug on the opposite side of the handle which may have been used to hook it on to the side of the punch bowl. The strainers are normally marked in the piercing in the centre of the bowl. These strainers are popularly used nowadays as tea strainers although the size is larger than a normal tea strainer.

*Britannia Standard silver. In 1696, so extensive had become the melting and clipping of coinage that the silversmiths were forbidden to use the sterling standard for their wares, but had to use a new higher standard, 95.8 per cent pure. New hallmarks were ordered, “the figure of a woman commonly called Britannia” and the lion’s head erased (torn off at the neck) replacing the lion passant and the leopard’s head crowned. This continued until the old standard of 92.5 per cent was restored in 1720. Britannia standard silver still continues to be produced even today.

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